KNOW YOUR VAX

Learn about the recommended vaccines for adolescents and young adults, including HPV, MenACWY, MenB, Tdap, Flu, and COVID-19

Recommended Vaccines Schedule for Adolescents and Young Adults

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends vaccines for adolescents and young adults be administered at different times based on immune system responses and the chances of developing certain diseases at different ages. Following the CDC recommended schedule for vaccines helps ensure adolescents and young adults are protected from these dangerous diseases at the right time.1

  • 11-12 Years – HPV (2 doses)*, Tdap, MenACWY dose 1**
  • 16 Years – MenACWY Booster, MenB**
  • 17-18 – Tdap booster (every 10 years)
  • Annually at every age – seasonal flu and COVID-19

* The HPV series can begin at 9 years old. HPV catch-up vaccination is recommended through 26 years of age. 
** The MenACWY vaccine is a two-dose vaccine, with the first dose recommended for ages 11-12 and the second recommended at age 16. The MenB vaccine is also a two-dose vaccine recommended for ages 16-18.2 You may be able to get one dose of the MenABCWY vaccine, approved by the FDA in October 2023, when both MenACWY and MenB vaccines are indicated at the same clinic visit.3 Talk to your healthcare provider about which vaccine is most appropriate for you.

What are these vaccines? What do they do?

Click to view dosing schedules and quick facts about each vaccine:

The HPV vaccine is recommended for everyone ages 9-26 to help prevent human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S.4 This vaccine also helps prevent genital warts caused by HPV and is over 90% effective at preventing six HPV-related cancers including cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oral or throat cancers.5 Since HPV is transmitted through sexual activity, it is recommended the vaccine is given prior to a person becoming sexually active. Without vaccination, almost every sexually active person will get HPV.4


Dosing info: 1st dose, ages 11-12 years old (can start as early as 9 years old). 2nd dose, 6-12 months after 1st dose. If you are 15 or older when receiving your first dose, three doses will be required.6


Quick Facts on This Vax:

  • HPV vaccination does not cause fertility problems.7
  • Only 64.6% of girls and 60.6% of boys aged 13–17 years have completed the required doses of HPV vaccines.8
  • Over 15 years of monitoring and research by the CDC and FDA support the safety and effectiveness of this vaccine.7
  1. Vaccine schedule for children, 7 to 18 years old. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. February 10, 2023. Accessed December 14, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/easy-to-read/adolescent-easyread.html.
  2. Meningococcal vaccination: What everyone should know. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 20, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mening/public/index.html.
  3. CDC committee Oks recommendations for pentavalent meningococcal, mpox vaccines, AAP News, October 25, 2023, Accessed December 11, 2023. https://publications.aap.org/aapnews/news/27054/CDC-committee-OKs-recommendations-for-pentavalent
  4. Std Facts - Human papillomavirus (HPV). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. April 12, 2022. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv.htm.
  5. History of HPV Vaccination. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://sjr-redesign.stjude.org/content/dam/research-redesign/centers-initiatives/hpv-cancer-prevention-program/hpv-advocacy-campaign/history-hpv-vaccination.pdf.
  6. HPV vaccine. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. August 16, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/vaccine-for-hpv.html.
  7. HPV vaccine safety. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. July 23, 2021. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/vaccinesafety.html.
  8. Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — National Immunization Survey–Teen, United States, 2022 | MMWR (cdc.gov). https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/72/wr/mm7234a3.htm. Accessed December 11, 2023
  9. Meningococcal disease: Technical and clinical information. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. February 7, 2022. Accessed December 14, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/clinical-info.html.
  10. Vaccine information statement. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. August 6, 2021. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/tdap.html.
  11. The long history of mRNA vaccines. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. October 6, 2021. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://publichealth.jhu.edu/2021/the-long-history-of-mrna-vaccines.
  12. Katella K. The updated COVID vaccines are here: 10 things to know. Yale Medicine. October 4, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.yalemedicine.org/news/updated-covid-vaccine-10-things-to-know.
  13. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Novavax COVID-19 vaccine, adjuvanted. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. October 17, 2023. Accessed December 14, 2023. https://www.fda.gov/vaccines-blood-biologics/coronavirus-covid-19-cber-regulated-biologics/novavax-covid-19-vaccine-adjuvanted.
  14. Updated COVID-19 vaccine recommendations now available. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. September 12, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/respiratory-viruses/whats-new/covid-vaccine-recommendations-9-12-2023.html.
  15. FDA Takes Action on Updated mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines to Better Protect Against Currently Circulating Variants. US Food and Drug Administration. Published online September 11, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-takes-action-updated-mrna-covid-19-vaccines-better-protect-against-currently-circulating.
  16. Lance R. How COVID-19 vaccines were made so quickly without cutting corners. Science News. June 29, 2021. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/covid-coronavirus-vaccine-development-speed.
  17. Covid-19 vaccine safety in children and teens. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. October 23, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/vaccine-safety-children-teens.html.
  18. Flu season. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. September 20, 2022. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/index.html.
  19. Key facts about seasonal flu vaccine. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. August 25, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/keyfacts.htm.
  20. Getting a flu vaccine and other recommended vaccines at the same time. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 2, 2023. Accessed November 21, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/coadministration.htm.